social-media-communication

Social Media for Writers (Part 1)

This is the first of a new series of posts. As a full-time writer, I find Facebook to be more of a writer’s medium than other social platforms and use it to augment my daily writing practice. That said, given the 24/7 nature of news and entertainment media, and the over-sharing that goes on, it is easy to lose hours reading, commenting, sharing, liking stuff on FB rather than focusing on the real work of writing. Not to mention what it does to one’s creativity — think of the image of a whole, smooth egg with the caption “This is your brain” and then the image of messily-scrambled eggs with the caption “This is your brain on social media.” Yeah. It can be like that. So, in this first post of the series, In this first post of the series, I focus on why, as a writer, I prefer FB and how I try to organize and ration my usage time to avoid that brain-as-scrambled-eggs scenario. Future posts will be about how to use it more effectively to collaborate with other writers, engage meaningfully with other readers, and promote oneself as a writer. Continue reading Social Media for Writers (Part 1)

susan b anthony

#Bornonthisday: Susan B Anthony (and her ‘Homes of Single Women’ speech)

Susan B Anthony, women’s rights activist, slavery abolition activist, and educational reformer, was born today in 1820. If it wasn’t for her and her many cohorts, we women today, across the world, would not be enjoying the many freedoms we take for granted. Having grown up in a patriarchal world, I constantly remind myself of these words of hers: “. . .many young people think that all the privileges, all the freedom, all the enjoyments which woman now possesses always were hers. They have no idea of how every single inch of ground that she stands upon today has been gained by the hard work of some little handful of women of the past.” Continue reading #Bornonthisday: Susan B Anthony (and her ‘Homes of Single Women’ speech)

5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads from January 2017

The 2016 BASS collection is my all-time favorite edition of the entire series so far. For one, a terrific writer of color who actively advocates for other writers of color has guest-edited it: Junot Diaz. For another, it includes stories from smaller literary venues and not just the traditional establishment names. What is rare for me is that I enjoyed every single story in this particular collection so much (with, perhaps, the exception of one — see below) that I am unable to even pick my top favorites. So, instead of choosing, I have simply shared ten out of the twenty stories because they are all available free online. Stories by: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohammed Naseehu Ali, Ted Chiang, Louise Erdrich, Ben Marcus, John Edgar Wideman, Yuko Sakata, Meron Hadero, Daniel J O’Malley and Karen Russell. Continue reading Top Five Short Story Reads from January 2017

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Movie Review: The Truce (1997)

Originally posted on indiatopia:
On October 19th, 1945, Primo Levi, an Italian Jew and chemist, finally returned to his home in Turin, Italy after having spent 11 months at Auschwitz and another harrowing ~9 months on a circuitous, long journey via Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. The Truce is a movie about that journey, during which time, he also began his writing career. Given… Continue reading Movie Review: The Truce (1997)

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Weekend Poem: Abundant Hope by Maya Angelou

Originally posted on indiatopia:
Maya Angelou is a living monument. So, it was fitting that, when the Martin Luther King Memorial was dedicated in August 2011, she wrote a poem in his honor. With the 50th anniversary of that historic March on Washington coming up, let’s revisit that poem. Of course, with Angelou, it’s always better if you can find a video of her performing… Continue reading Weekend Poem: Abundant Hope by Maya Angelou