Booknotes: Favorite Writing How-to Books Part 6

Last month, I shared three free writing how-to resources in the form of podcasts. This month, let's look at more free online resources — in the form of online blogs/websites. While there are way too many blogs and websites out there related to almost every aspect of writing beyond just craft, I am listing below only those related to craft and only those which, over the years have been my frequent go-to sites. This is not to say I have not found other many useful ones through google searches or recommendations from other writer friends. But, well, sometimes, you get hooked on a particular kind of advice delivered in a particular kind of way, right?

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5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads for November 2017

For November and December, let's revisit the best of the last ten months of short stories from this ongoing series. Why bother with this? For one, I find many short stories, when reread, give us new flavors, textures, nuances, etc., that we might have missed during the first read. For another, I do not want these amazing stories to simply get buried in the archives. So here are the five best-of-the-best from January-May 2017: stories by Karen Russell, Mohammed Naseehu Ali, Leila Aboulela, Robert Olen Butler, Helen Oyeyemi. These were very hard to pick, as you can imagine.

Published: Booknotes: The Good Immigrant (The Aerogram)

One of the finest essay collections I have read this year is 'The Good Immigrant'. Edited by writer Nikesh Shukla, the collection has essays from 21 Black, Asian, Minority Ethnic (BAME) creatives from across the UK. These are writers, actors, comedians, and more, writing about their experiences growing up as immigrants or children of immigrants. A review by me was just published over at The Aerogram — a US-based South Asian art, literature, life and news site. Funded by, among others, J K Rowling, and blurbed by, among others, Zadie Smith, it came out after the Brexit vote and during the peak madness of the US presidential election. Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) creatives (writers, actors, comedians, and more) from across the UK came together to write and share their experiences as immigrants or children of immigrants. Their themes, however, are universal and, having been an immigrant across various countries myself, I found much to identify with and ponder.