Booknotes: Favorite Writing How-to Books Part 5

In this month's installment, let's look at podcasts related to writing. I am a huge fan of literary podcasts (especially the ones from BBC Radio 3 and 4 and, of course, NPR) because I get to listen to conversations with favorite writers from the comfort of my home, at my convenience, and while I'm multi-tasking. The podcasts I am listing below, however, are ones I have stuck with for more than three years or so. I do not listen to every single episode but I do subscribe to their feeds. One thing I will say upfront about these is that they are not as diverse as I would like them to be. To be clear, I do not mean only in terms of racial or ethnic diversity, though that is also a gap, but diversity in terms of gender identity, class, caste, sexuality, disability, etc. I do hope this will improve over time.

5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads for June 2017

Father's Day falls on June 18th. So here are a few short stories of fathers-and-sons and fathers-and-daughters -- another double bonanza collection because there are far too many good ones out there. I had to put some aside to share for next year or this list would get too long. As always, these are free to read online -- just click the story titles -- so please do share and read with your own families. The stories are from these amazing writers: Ben Marcus, Jesmyn Ward, Premchand, Yu Hua, Junot Diaz, Amy Bloom, Rick Attig, Sharon Telfer, Grace Paley, Lesley Nneka Arimah, and Ian Frazier.

Booknotes: Jane Eyre

UPDATE: April 21, 2017:

It’s Charlotte Brontë’s birthday today so I’m reblogging this from last year.

 

I recently watched the TV movie on the Brontës: ‘To Walk Invisible’. Written and directed by the wonderful Sally Wainwright, it is more faithful to the Gaskell biography version than to any other. This means it shows Branwell, the brother, as the main cause for the loss of their meager family fortunes due to his alcoholism and drug addiction, especially during the last three years of his life. While this was handled with great care to make sure he did not come across as some monster, I wish we had seen more of the sisters than we did of the brother. Read on for more.

indiatopia

jane eyreIn my book circles, the Austen vs Brontës debate has come up often. And, though I’ve come to appreciate Austen’s finer points over time, I have always preferred the Brontës. With the three Brontë sisters, there’s the Charlotte vs Emily debate (Anne, sadly, doesn’t get much airtime). This has been harder. For years, I stuck with Emily because I found ‘Wuthering Heights’ more poetic in terms of language — I never cared for the whole Heathcliff-and-Cathy psychopathology.

That said, I reread ‘Jane Eyre‘ recently and I am now firmly in the Charlotte Brontë camp. This is not just another Gothic romance. If you read it in the context of its times and its author’s life, it is a work of remarkable daring and independence. Jane Eyre is a strong-willed woman who manages to get past her plain looks and poverty and stand up to the…

View original post 1,286 more words