5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads From March 2017

Fiction from real world events has been done since our cave-dwelling ancestors drew crude wall graphics or sat around fires telling each other embellished and exaggerated personal anecdotes. So, the first step for me, before I began my own such short story, was to look at examples of outstanding short fiction primarily inspired by headlines or real events. Below, you will find five such stories (free to read online, just click the story title link) from Roxane Gay, Robert Olen Butler, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Susan Glaspell, and Meera Nair. From quietly tragic to cleverly satiric to magically surreal, these stories do a whole lot more than tell us what simply happened: they show us the textures, shapes, and densities that might exist below the superficial layers and what that might mean for our own lives. Continue reading Top Five Short Story Reads From March 2017

5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads From February 2017

Over the past month, I focused on writers from the seven countries that were/are on the US Travel Ban list. Most of them are, of course, Arabic language writers, so I am thankful to be able to find English translations free online. I got the idea from Asymptote Journal’s project to collect writing from these banned countries. Their special feature issue, with at least two stories from each, will be out in April 2017. Though the list below is rather male-centric — because we are dealing, mostly, with highly patriarchal cultures — I have searched harder to get some women writers too. So here are stories from: Goli Taraghi (Iran); Hassan Blasim (Iraq); Hisham Matar (Libya); Nuruddin Farah (Somalia); Leila Aboulela (Sudan); Zakaria Tamer (Syria); and Nadia Al-Kokabany (Yemen). Continue reading Top Five Short Story Reads From February 2017

5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads from January 2017

The 2016 BASS collection is my all-time favorite edition of the entire series so far. For one, a terrific writer of color who actively advocates for other writers of color has guest-edited it: Junot Diaz. For another, it includes stories from smaller literary venues and not just the traditional establishment names. What is rare for me is that I enjoyed every single story in this particular collection so much (with, perhaps, the exception of one — see below) that I am unable to even pick my top favorites. So, instead of choosing, I have simply shared ten out of the twenty stories because they are all available free online. Stories by: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohammed Naseehu Ali, Ted Chiang, Louise Erdrich, Ben Marcus, John Edgar Wideman, Yuko Sakata, Meron Hadero, Daniel J O’Malley and Karen Russell. Continue reading Top Five Short Story Reads from January 2017

5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads from November-December 2016

Indian short films get, well, more short shrift in India and among the Indian diaspora the world over because Bollywood masala reigns supreme. Still, I am finding this to be a fascinatingly growing, evolving genre. There are some absolute gems to be found if you know where to look. Here are some of them, ranging from 8-30 minutes each, and written by Ritesh Batra, Rashida Mustafa and Suketu Mehta, Kaushal Oza, Leena Pandharkar, and Anand Gandhi. We have a street-dwelling shoeshine boy who wants to be a masterchef on TV, a woman who leaves her husband and child to be another man’s second wife, a Parsi widow trying to deal with well-meaning relatives, a 65-year-old Indian immigrant in the US trying to cope with early retirement, a cast of 15 characters connected across a single day by 2 sets of causal events that come full circle for the one who started it all off. Enjoy. I think all have English subtitles too. Continue reading Top Five Short Story Reads from November-December 2016

5 short stories

Top Five Short Story Reads from October 2016

For me, the best “horror” story fits this description by Neil Gaiman: “I like horror, but I tend to like it as seasoning. I’d get very bored if I was told I had to write a horror novel. I’d love to write a novel with horror elements, but, too much, and it doesn’t taste of anything else.” So, here are some terrific horror short stories by Usman Malik, Alyssa Wong, Ruskin Bond, Kelly Link, and Stephen King. Continue reading Top Five Short Story Reads from October 2016