marginalia

Marginalia: Journal Prompts (January)

I have written before about the old practice of journaling and why people (including myself) maintain them. I have also shared how journaling helps sustain both a reading habit and a writing habit. And I have described how the diaries/journals of writers can be like writing instruction manuals if read properly. [. . .] So here is a new monthly series on journal prompts for those who like or want to start this practice. Of course, it helps if you create your own but, sometimes, we all need that little nudge to think outside the box. If these do not appeal, there are plenty out there in google-land.

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2018: Reading and Writing Resolutions and Word of the Year

"The beginning is the word and the end is silence; and, in between, are all the stories." ~ Kate Atkinson, Human Croquet. This quote, for me, sums up a human life. Each year begins with so many possible stories for each of us, some imagined and some unimagined. By the end of the year, what we have to show for it is a collection of all the stories we experienced/read/wrote/shared. Stories, after all, are what we are made of. When we reach that silent end, we leave, in our wake, our stories to be shared on — whether through our own writing or through the memories of others. So, for a few years now, as part of setting my usual personal goals, I have also set specific goals for reading and writing. And my 2018 word/theme for the year is "focus" [. . .] With that, I wish you a Happy New Year. May 2018 bring you positive beginnings, fresh experiences, and unimagined joys. And may many magical stories enrich your life and nourish your soul.

2017: The Year in Reading and Writing

Recently, a writer friend asked on Facebook: "What is a word you love?" I did not have to think too long as there is one I have loved for nearly two decades now. It was probably in 2000 when I first came across it while reading about Rumi's relationship with his spiritual guide, Shams-i-Tabrīzī. "Sohbet" is a word of Persian origin, though some also trace the etymology back to Arabic and Ottoman Turkish. It means discourse or conversation between a learned, enlightened one (murshid) and the one committed (murid) to such a person. I hesitate to use the words teacher and student because "murshid" and "murid" mean so much more than that. Just as "sohbet" means so much more than mere dialogue. In the Sufi tradition, there are three ways of being spiritual, with each being a level higher than the previous: prayer; meditation; and sohbet. That highest way of spiritual being, sohbet, is a mystical practice involving an exchange of knowledge and devotion between the murshid and murid through storytelling traditions. It involves a healing, a cleansing, and a coming together of their minds, hearts, and souls. The murshid cultivates and educates the murid with care and compassion and their deep connection is one of true respect and trust. Through such a practice of sohbet, the murid is able to find a sense of unity with everything.